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Testimonials

  • I felt your surgery center, staff and nurses to be excellent and very helpful in meeting my needs.  Thank you so much for your help and assistance.  It was very much appreciated.            

    E. Lambino
    United States
  • The scars are almost invisible and my breasts are really natural looking and the best part is: it cost much less than one-third of the price of what I would have paid in  Australia - totally affordable and within my budge...

    Roseli T., Australia
    Hungary
  • I will come back to Beverly Hills Medical Group because I was satisfied with my previous operation. Staff are very professional. Also, thanks to nurse Katrina, she explained very well about the procedure.

    Tomasita
    Philippines
  • My name is Sheila and Im 37. For years I wanted to have lipo done to get rid of the just hard to get places.  Several of my friends and my brother have had it done. Some are happy and others not so happy with the results.  I think th...

    L. L., Canada
    Canada
  • The nurses and staff were so caring and friendly at Beverly Hills Medical Group. I felt very much in safe hands. I was also reassured by the fact that my surgeon, who carried out the liposuction is one of the most experienced surgeons...

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    Netherlands
  • I always had acne on my face but could never get it controlled or treated by the many dermatologist that I went through.  Finally, while in Manila on a business trip I decided to go to Beverly Hills Medical Group.  I have been going there for treatment for two m...

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    Cambodia

Different Kinds of Dentures

Different Kinds of Dentures

Dentures fall into two basic categories, full plate and partial. The partial denture can cover your need for one tooth or several. The full denture plate will replace an entire set of natural teeth.

Full dentures are commonly referred to as standard dentures. They have the full acrylic mouth piece that adheres to the gums and roof of your mouth. Precise fitting is necessary in order to achieve the level of suction your dentures need to ensure a secure fit. Standard dentures typically take four visits to fit, design and manufacture, but your denture professional will work as long as necessary to make sure you have a comfortable fit.

Partial denture plates are made in much the same way, but are easier to fit since they cover a smaller area. The main difference is that partial dentures depend more on being attached to the teeth with special clips, and are less dependent on suction.

The Cu-Sil denture is a variation on the standard denture set. Cu-Sil dentures look like standards with one exception. They have open spaces to accommodate the few natural teeth that may be left. These dentures have the advantage of offering more stability because the remaining natural teeth help anchor the denture in place. Together with the proper suction, they can be very comfortable dentures to wear.

Immediate dentures, sometimes referred to as temporary dentures, are set into the open gum sockets immediately after the natural tooth has been removed. Immediate dentures give you the advantage of walking out of the dental office with new teeth the same day. However, as the gums begin to heal and swelling goes down, some shifting can take place and your denturist will need to make further adjustments to align the teeth properly.

Which brings us to the highest standard in denture stability, the implant denture. As with dentures in general, they fall into the two basic categories; full set and partial.

Whichever type of denture you and your dentist feel is right for you, advancements in denture technology have brought us the most natural looking and comfortable dentures the world has known to date.

Partial Dentures

If you are just missing a few teeth, then only partial dentures are called for. A partial denture, also known as a bridge, fills the gap left by a row of several missing teeth, or may leave intermittent slots for remaining natural teeth. These dentures are extremely versatile and will be custom made for your exact needs.

A partial denture is constructed of a pink acrylic base set with life-like false teeth. The entire bridge is supported by a metal framework. Partial dentures can have either of two modes for attachment; removable or permanent. Let's take a look at both styles.

Removable partial dentures may use metal clasps that attach to remaining natural teeth, often referred to as abutments. A crown is usually added to the abutment teeth to provide the denture with added strength and give a better fit. Another type of clip called a precision attachment may also be used with this denture. Precision attachments generally look better and are nearly invisible when the denture is in place.

Learning to insert your removable partial denture is going to take a little practice. The denture will feel a little awkward at first, but within a few days you should become accustomed quite nicely to it. A well made denture should attach fairly easily and should never require forcing, which might break the clips. Biting down to place your dentures is a no-no, and again, you don't want to risk breaking your brand new denture. Establish good habits in the beginning and your dentures should last longer.

Partial dentures can also be installed permanently, and are generally referred to as fixed dentures. Again, crowns will be installed to the abutment teeth to beef up support. The partial denture may then be bonded directly to the abutment teeth for a secure permanent fit.

Another method of permanently installing partial dentures is the implant method. Titanium rods will be installed directly into the boney ridges of the jaw, either pointing up or down depending on which jaw, and individual teeth are then cemented to each post. The rods can also be installed in the front surface of the gums and a whole denture bridge can then be mounted on the posts. Implants have a great success rate and while more expensive, are becoming very popular due to the great stability and natural look they can provide.

Your new dentures should also make eating easier again. Softer foods are recommended at first until you become used to having the denture in place.

In a short time, your new partial dentures will seem as normal to you as your own natural teeth.

Complete Dentures

While having your own natural teeth is preferable, circumstances may someday require a complete set of dentures. Careful consideration should be used when deciding what type of denture will be right for you, and no one is more qualified to help you through the process than your denture professional. Why not be informed of the pros and cons ahead of time, as well as the great advancements being made in denture technology.

First let's take a look at some of the challenges you may face acquiring and learning to use your new dentures. Then we'll offer some solutions.

Difficulty speaking and chewing are some of the first hurdles new denture wearers face. Food may actually work its way up under the denture base. New dentures also feel rather foreign to your mouth, but that sensation goes away by itself with a few days wear. New dentures may also slip around a little or come loose from the gum ridge at times.

All of this can be difficult to deal with, however, properly made dentures with an accurate custom fit will head off most of these problems before they even come up. If necessary, the new dentures can have the teeth relined to match up more precisely. The denture base can be also further polished or adjusted for a better fit, which should eliminate any sore spots on the natural gums. A close accurate fit is the key to denture comfort.

Waiting a good eight weeks before fitting dentures will give your gums time to better heal from the extractions, and also allow for shrinkage that will occur in the boney ridge during this period. Since relines and adjustments can become expensive, be a patient and allow time for healing first. Then you have the best base to start with.

Some patients opt for the immediate type of denture. These dentures are selected and manufactured before the natural teeth are extracted. The teeth are then ready and waiting to be inserted directly into the open sockets as soon as the natural teeth come out. The main drawback of immediate dentures is that the teeth can sometimes shift slightly as the gums heal and the bone goes through the natural shrinking process. Frequently, immediate dentures will require some adjustments during the first six months after installment. However, the greatest advantage to immediate dentures is the fact that you will emerge from your denturist's office with a complete set of teeth.

As always, you should take the best possible care of your natural teeth. But should the need ever arise, your denture professional will be there to guide you guide you through the process to complete denture success.

Permanent Dentures

Dentures that slip, slide and pop out can be a thing of the past with permanent type dentures. Permanent dentures are right on the cutting edge of denture technology. Old style dentures used to rely solely on suction and/or clips to help keep them in place, but that was an imperfect system. Learning to chew with new dentures can be a little intimidating at first, but try it while your teeth are floating around in your mouth and the degree of difficulty shoots right up the scale. Permanent dentures are a terrific alternative. Let's get an overview of the process and types of permanent dentures available.

To begin, your denturist will help you select the type of denture you need based upon your individual situation. One tooth, several teeth, or a full set of dentures may be in order. Then the custom fitting process begins. Fitting your dentures is a multi-stage process that will require several visits. At the first visit, your denturist will do a thorough examination of your mouth and make sure that your gum tissue and ridges are in the proper shape to support the dentures. If no surgical re-shaping is needed, your denturist will then take a soft bite impression of your upper and lower jaws. This impression will be used to make a wax bite impression that plastic teeth can be set into to get a working model for the final denture to be constructed from. Once the final denture is made and given your approval you are ready for permanent mounting.

Permanent dentures can be mounted in different ways. A partial denture ridge can be permanently mounted by bonding it to the abutment teeth which have been built up with crowns for added stability. This can be quite adequate to hold a partial denture in place, but there is another method that is even more secure because it doesn't depend on the natural teeth not decaying. This style is called the implant method.

Implant dentures are suitable no matter how many teeth you need, the mounting method varies only slightly. The basic process involves surgically implanting titanium rods directly into the bone tissue of your gums. The rods will be positioned according to the shape and location of your new denture, either pointing up or down from the appropriate jaw, or facing outward for frontal bridges. When your gums have completely healed, the new dentures can be permanently cemented to the exposed posts.

The result is dentures that look wonderful and feel so natural that no one will suspect you're wearing them. Consult your denturist to see if permanent dentures are the right choice for you.

Implant Supported Dentures

Are implant supported dentures more beneficial than standard dentures? That's a question many denture wearers have been asking themselves. Your answers to the following simple questions may help you decide.

  • Do your dentures slip when you speak?
  • Does food get under your dentures when you eat?
  • Do your old dentures seem to be losing their grip?
  • DebridementAre you just plain tired of dealing with sore gums?

f you found yourself answering yes more than once, you owe it to yourself to find out a little more about implant supported dentures.

What exactly do we mean when we say "denture implants"? The term implant refers directly to a surgical procedure that is performed under anesthetic. One or more small titanium rods are literally screwed into the bone of the dental ridge under your gums, and the tops of the rods are left exposed above the gum line. The implants are then given time to heal, usually at least two months. If all looks good, then you are ready for mounting.

The number of implants depends on exactly what type of denture you are mounting to them. A full denture plate can be mounted with just a few strategically placed rods, and much the same for a partial. Single teeth can also be cemented to individual posts.

Dentures that have been permanently implanted have a few advantages. Number one is stability. Since implanted dentures are anchored to the jaw with titanium screws, you never have to worry about them moving around. No more shifting while you speak or chew. Dentures rubbing your gums and leaving tender spots are a thing of the past. Implant supported dentures stay put.

A common problem most standard denture wearers will eventually face is bone resorption. Once natural teeth have been removed there is no longer any pressure stimulation to the boney ridge beneath the gums. Bone production now slows to a halt and the bone begins to deteriorate, resulting in a shrunken appearance. It is this shrinkage that causes once perfectly fitted dentures to begin slipping. Even with adjustments or total replacement dentures, bone resorption will continue throughout the denture wearers life time, eventually making it impossible to wear conventional dentures.

This is where implant supported dentures shine their brightest (no pun intended). The pressure stimulation provided by the implanted titanium rods means little to none of the bone shrinkage that usually spoils the fit of standard dentures within a couple of years. Titanium is actually the best material for implants as it has been found more compatible with the bone tissue, which actually attaches to the rods as it grows. The result? Stabile dentures and no more sore spots!

If any of this sounds to you like an improvement over standard dentures, then implant supported dentures may be the right choice for you. Be sure to consult with your denture professional.

Flexible Dentures

Wait no longer, flexible dentures are here! Whether it's your first time choosing a denture, or if you are just plain tired of your old painful dentures rubbing against your gums, flexible dentures simply have one of the highest comfort levels of any dentures available. How long has it been since you've sat down at the ball game with a bag of nuts? Probably too long if you're wearing conventional dentures.

What's the secret? It's the flexible resin coating on the outer layer of the denture base. This flexibility allows the denture to lock in around the undercut of the jaw bone for superior stability. Flexible dentures are so light and thin you'll hardly feel like you're wearing them.

Flexible dentures are cosmetically pleasing too. The denture base has transparent pink shading which allows your natural gum color to show through for an absolutely great blend. And you can still choose the style and shade of teeth you'd like to go with them.

And the benefits don't stop there. The flexible resin material is non-porous, so it won't support the growth of bacteria. That means no more denture breath! But even though it's non-porous, the denture will still retain a slight amount of moisture to keep it comfortable against your gums.

Now let's talk about durability. Flexible denture bases are basically unbreakable, unlike standard acrylic bases that can crack if you drop them in the sink during cleaning. No such worries with flexible resin dentures. And even though flexible resin denture bases are more expensive than their close cousins, the soft denture, they make up for it by lasting far longer.

Want more good news? Let's talk fitting. Standard acrylic denture bases require multiple stages to fit and manufacture. Once the wax bite try-in is refined for a perfect fit, it's sent back to the lab where the traditional heat curing of the acrylic base often shrinks the final product, leading to the need for further adjustment to the denture base. With flexible resin dentures, the try-in used during the trial fitting can actually be used in the final denture, shortening the entire process, so you get your dentures faster.

Flexible dentures may just be the denture the world has been waiting for, so what are you waiting for? The sooner you have your new dentures, the sooner you have the freedom to eat what you really want. Go ahead...bite into that juicy red apple. With flexible dentures, you can!

Full Dentures

If you are just missing a few teeth, then only partial dentures are called for. A partial denture, also known as a bridge, fills the gap left by a row of several missing teeth, or may leave intermittent slots for remaining natural teeth. These dentures are extremely versatile and will be custom made for your exact needs.

A partial denture is constructed of a pink acrylic base set with life-like false teeth. The entire bridge is supported by a metal framework. Partial dentures can have either of two modes for attachment; removable or permanent. Let's take a look at both styles.

Removable partial dentures may use metal clasps that attach to remaining natural teeth, often referred to as abutments. A crown is usually added to the abutment teeth to provide the denture with added strength and give a better fit. Another type of clip called a precision attachment may also be used with this denture. Precision attachments generally look better and are nearly invisible when the denture is in place.

Learning to insert your removable partial denture is going to take a little practice. The denture will feel a little awkward at first, but within a few days you should become accustomed quite nicely to it. A well made denture should attach fairly easily and should never require forcing, which might break the clips. Biting down to place your dentures is a no-no, and again, you don't want to risk breaking your brand new denture. Establish good habits in the beginning and your dentures should last longer.

Partial dentures can also be installed permanently, and are generally referred to as fixed dentures. Again, crowns will be installed to the abutment teeth to beef up support. The partial denture may then be bonded directly to the abutment teeth for a secure permanent fit.

Another method of permanently installing partial dentures is the implant method. Titanium rods will be installed directly into the boney ridges of the jaw, either pointing up or down depending on which jaw, and individual teeth are then cemented to each post. The rods can also be installed in the front surface of the gums and a whole denture bridge can then be mounted on the posts. Implants have a great success rate and while more expensive, are becoming very popular due to the great stability and natural look they can provide.

Your new dentures should also make eating easier again. Softer foods are recommended at first until you become used to having the denture in place.

In a short time, your new partial dentures will seem as normal to you as your own natural teeth.

Soft Dentures

Get ready for the most comfortable dentures you are ever going to wear, the soft denture. Soft dentures are on their way to becoming the gold standard in denture technology. Completely flexible, yet with a grip so firm you can bite an apple, soft dentures finally offer what denture wearers have always dreamed of; a denture that doesn't hurt or slip.

Soft dentures are completely made of a flexible resin, differing slightly from their close cousin, the flexible denture which consists of a flexible resin overlay on an acrylic denture base.

Let's take a look at why soft dentures fit so snugly. Our jaw ridges tend to be wider near where the teeth meet the gums and tend to curve slightly inward just above and below our natural teeth. This curve inward is referred to as the undercut. When being inserted, a soft denture has the ability to give a little as it passes over the widest point of the gum, but then flexes back inward to conform to the undercut.

That's how such a soft denture can provide a great grip without any clips. And perhaps the best part, curving into the undercut keeps food from getting up under the denture. You can go out to dinner and not worry about having to remove your dentures and rinse them in a public restroom.

Soft dentures may wear out a little sooner than flexible resin over acrylic denture types, but they are still far more durable than standard acrylic denture bases. And while soft dentures are still capable of being relined, you may not need any adjustments at all. The small amount of give in the resin material allows a soft denture to rest against your gums more completely, eliminating those agonizing sore spots caused by pressure points on acrylic dentures.

It may interest you to know that the flexible resin used in soft dentures is hypo-allergenic. That's good news for those who are allergic to acrylic and thought they could never wear a denture.

In addition to comfort and fit, soft dentures also look really great. The base has a soft pink transparent tone that allows some of your natural gum color to show through, and no unsightly clips to give away the fact that you're wearing a denture.

So, if you'd almost given up hope of ever finding a truly comfortable denture that is so secure you could grind nuts with it, the soft denture may be just the ticket.

Upper Dentures

Simply put, upper dentures are dentures that replace missing teeth in your upper jaw. If your denturist has given you a thorough oral examination and pronounced your lower dentition in good shape, but you have teeth in your upper dental ridge that is either already gone or in need of removal, then upper dentures may be all you require.

Upper dentures are available in many types to suit your denture needs. Let's start with a basic overview.

First of all, how many teeth will your upper denture need to replace? An upper denture can be manufactured to replace one or more missing teeth. This would be the difference between a partial, and a full standard denture.

A standard full upper denture is constructed of a pink denture base that stretches across the entire palate, or roof of the mouth. Teeth are set into this denture and are precisely positioned to align with teeth in the lower jaw. It is necessary to have a full base with this type of denture in order to achieve enough suction to provide stability. Otherwise, the denture will tend to move around, making speech and eating difficult. Sometimes a denture adhesive product may be necessary to provide extra grip.

A partial upper plate, also referred to as a bridge, does not require suction to the mouth roof for stability. These dentures typically use a clip system to attach them to the remaining teeth they will be filling in between. A precise fit will still provide some suction to the dental ridge. Partial upper dentures can also be permanently bonded to the remaining teeth. Crowns will usually be placed on these abutment teeth in order to strengthen the whole structure, giving the denture a firm permanent placement.

Some people find they cannot tolerate a full upper denture. The base over the palate may produce a gagging sensation, rendering the denture unwearable. Modifications may help this situation. The easiest solution would be to cut away a section from the back of the denture base a little at a time. This would determine how much base is still needed for suction, and exactly how much base an individual can tolerate.

If there is no happy medium to be reached, then denture implants should be considered an option. Small titanium rods can be implanted into the dental ridge in order to mount the upper denture. The full palate denture base is no longer needed for suction and can be completely removed, leaving a base that rests snugly against the gum ridge. There is an additional benefit. Now that the palate is exposed, it's possible to taste the full flavor of food again.

Your denture professional has the knowledge and expertise to guide you to an upper denture that is just right for you.

Removable Dentures

If you know you need dentures and you've explored the possibility of implants, but you're not ready to commit to the surgical option, then removable dentures may be a good place to start.

Removable dentures can serve the need for a few teeth or a complete set. Depending on your personal needs, there a few options in removable dentures available. Standard removable dentures have been the type most often used, whether it's a partial or full plate. Picture those teeth floating in a glass and you have the general idea. Cu-Sil dentures are a variation on the standard denture. The Cu-Sil denture leaves slots for remaining natural teeth to poke through, adding stability.

Removable dentures are also available in a variety of materials. The type of material used for denture construction varies in comfort and price. The standard acrylic base can provide a great fit when properly manufactured, leading to a decent level of comfort and stability. Flexible type denture bases made with a layer of flexible resin coating on an acrylic base can move comfort and stability up to the next level. Soft type denture bases are made totally from the flexible resin, without the acrylic base material. This type of removable denture offers the most comfort.

Removable dentures are less expensive than permanent dentures, especially denture implants, but they do have some possible drawbacks to consider. Remember the old adage, "You get what you pay for".

Removable dentures of any type may give you the opportunity to take the denture out and give your gum tissue a rest, but why would your gums need a rest? Perhaps because that removable denture has also been doing some moving around on your dental ridge causing sore spots.

Removable dentures need to be adjusted or replaced periodically. Once natural teeth have been removed from the dental ridge, your bone begins to shrink in a process called resorption. Without the pressure of the natural roots, your bone doesn't receive the necessary pressure stimulation required for continued bone production. The fit of the removable denture is affected by the receding bone, lessening the denture's grip and stability, and causing the need for further fitting and readjustments. Eventually, bone loss may make it impossible to hold removable dentures in place.

Remember, you can always rely on your denture professional to give you all the facts and help you select a removable denture that is right for you.